Drop The Bassz

Joker

String Bass player

22, Singapore

Lomo and Fisheye effects☮☮

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doublebassfeels:

bassplayerproblems:

I heard a cello player say “Oh my God, this friggin cello is too friggin heavy!”. Then she looked up and saw 4 bass players with our basses coming down the stairs behind her. Big, big mistake.

A flautist was bitching that she had to help unpack percussion equipment like everyone else. I put down my bass and started to help when, no joke, 40 of the orchestra members started SCREAMING at her. It was funny. Just a thought of first world problems.

doublebassfeels:

bassplayerproblems:

I heard a cello player say “Oh my God, this friggin cello is too friggin heavy!”. Then she looked up and saw 4 bass players with our basses coming down the stairs behind her. Big, big mistake.

A flautist was bitching that she had to help unpack percussion equipment like everyone else.

I put down my bass and started to help when, no joke, 40 of the orchestra members started SCREAMING at her. It was funny.

Just a thought of first world problems.

veni-vidi-bitchi:

and-also-lace:

kajar:

dissonancengine:

and-also-lace:

And then there are ones like this that are just too fancy to be allowed. 

The Victoria and Albert Museum says:

Viols were bowed instruments ranging from treble to bass, but by about 1780 they had been superceded by the violin and cello. However, this bass viol belonged to John Cawse (1779-1862), one of the earliest pioneers in the revival of Early Music. The body may have been made by Joachim Tielke (1641-1719), but the neck, fingerboard and tailpiece date from the mid 1720s. Cawse lent his instrument to be played in the Concert of Ancient Music at Windsor Castle, an event organized by Prince Albert (1819-1861) in 1845 and perhaps the first of its kind. Despite what was then a highly unusual enthusiasm, Prince Albert felt compelled to make economies in the Royal Household and abolish the obsolete post of Royal Lutenist at about this time.

the oberlin professor of viols owns the second largest collection of viols in the world i’m pretty sure and all of them are playable and at least one is by tielke

concerts of “ancient” music had been happening in england since the 1720’s, but the use of a viol in 1845 would have been very strange indeed. the last virtuoso of the viol was carl friedrich abel, a german expat living in london who died in 1787.

viols are super cool and also very different from the violin family so that’s not just a fancy cello. viols have 6-7 strings and are fretted and are played with an underhanded bow hold.

Having visited said professor’s home and collection, I gotta say that it is spectacular. She plays each of them. Each of them. They’re the second largest collection in the world, and she still treats them like distinct people, and knows all of their nuances. 

I am sooo glad I took viol with her for winter term.

That is so cool and I am jealous.  I loved my professors but wow.

Yep, I definitely thought this was a double bass for a minute. Double basses by today’s standard look so much like viols because there was no need to evolve them. They did away with six strings and made four standard, and stopped using frets, but a lot of double basses still use underhanded bow hold (German bow hold). It depends on your teacher and the bow you get when you start playing. But UGH I love the evolution of instruments through history.

(via doublebassfeels)

happy valentines day!

(Source: svvine)